2022 Florida Legislative Session Bill Tracker

[updated 2/12/2022]

 

Firearms

HB 103 Carrying of Firearms Without Licenses. This bill often referred to as “Constitutional Carry” removes the requirement that a license to carry a concealed firearm is required in order to carry such a firearm. This would also enable Florida citizens to carry a gun, open or concealed.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 793 Representation by Counsel in Hearings on Petitions for Risk Protection Orders. Risk Protection Orders (RPO), also known as Red Flag Law passed in 2018 in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas bill that took away gun rights and also added Risk Protection Orders where the government without due process (or much proof) can declare you are a danger to others and confiscate your firearms for a period of time. While the RPO law allows you to have legal representation at the RPO Hearing, but only if you can afford one. The RPO law does not allow for those who cannot afford an attorney to have one appointed by the Court. HB 793 amends the RPO law by allowing the Court to appoint legal representation to those that cannot afford an attorney.

The RLCFL supports and advocates for the total repeal of the unconstitutional Red Flag Laws, but short of total repeal, HB 793 at least honors long-standing legal rights in Court proceedings to have legal representation.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 6007 Licenses to Carry Concealed Weapons or Firearms. This bill would allow concealed carry licensees to carry a handgun or a concealed weapon or firearm into a college or university facility.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 6013 Removing Firearm Regulations. This bill repeals gun control laws passed in 2018 under the Marjorie Stoneham Douglas High School SB 7026 legislation, including the Red Flag Law, ban on bump stocks, and restores the age to purchase firearms back to 18 years old.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

State Government Laws on Emergency Orders

HB 215 / SB 254 Emergency Orders Prohibiting Religious Services or Activities. These bills provide that an emergency order may not expressly prohibit religious services or activities.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 261 / SB 422 Mobilization of the Florida National Guard. These bills would prohibit the Florida Guard’s deployment into “active-duty combat” without a congressional declaration of war. The National Guard was intended by the Founders and Ratifiers to be a defense force and nothing more. Deployments outside the country were not considered, and neither were internal deployments in pursuance of powers that were not delegated to the federal government. Congress has passed numerous laws in the past one hundred years giving the federal government additional authority not mentioned in the Constitution. These bills would reassert the authority of the governor over National Guard troops

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

SB 594 Discrimination on the Basis of COVID-19 Vaccination and Postinfection Recovery Status. This bill states that governmental entities may not require documentation of COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery status as a condition of licensure or certification in Florida. This is added to the language from SB 2006 (passed in the 2021 session) that says governmental entities may not require documentation of a COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery status to gain access to, entry upon, or service from the governmental agency. This bill also adds a new section that prohibits COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery status as a condition of employment by any employer, including, but not limited to, business entities, educational institutions, and governmental entities.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Elections

HJR 35 / SJR 244 Partisan Elections for Members of District School Boards. These bills would require that elections for school board members be partisan, currently, the Florida constitution requires school board elections to be non-partisan. If passed by the Florida Legislature, it would be placed on the November 2022 general election ballot as a proposed state constitutional amendment and would require 60% of voters to pass.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 99 Forensic Audit of the 2020 General Election. This bill requires the Governor to appoint independent third party to conduct forensic audit of 2020 general election; requires audit of certain precincts; provides dates by which such audit must begin and be completed; provides reporting requirements.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HJR 177 / SJR 950 Percentage of Elector Votes Required to Approve an Amendment or a Revision to the State Constitution. These bills propose an amendment to State Constitution to increase the percentage of votes required to approve an amendment to or revision of State Constitution from 60 percent to 66 and two-thirds percent, except that repeal of amendment or revision, need only be approved by the same percentage of votes as was required at time of passage of such amendment or revision. If passed by the Florida Legislature, it would be placed on the November 2022 general election ballot as a proposed state constitutional amendment and would require sixty percent of voters to pass.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

SB 524 Elections. This bill would create a new specialized unit investigating election crime allegations. It also calls on election supervisors to verify the address of every registered voter who has not voted in the last two years and voters who do not respond could be labeled inactive, setting them up for eventual removal from the rolls. SB 524 would also require voters who use mail-in ballots to include additional personal information on their ballot, require supervisors to scrub voting rolls once a year, offer free state-issued ID cards to someone who is already registered to vote, and increase criminal penalties on those who engage in “ballot harvesting”.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HJR 663 / SJR 1004 Recall of County Officers and Commissioners. These bills propose an amendment to Florida’s Constitution which would provide that any member of governing body of a non-charter county may be removed from office by the voters of the non-charter county. Currently, only twenty charter counties in Florida have the ability to recall an elected county official. If passed by the Florida Legislature, it would be placed on the November 2022 general election ballot as a proposed state constitutional amendment and would require sixty percent of voters to pass.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

SJR 1644 Limitation on Terms of Office for Members of a District School Board. This bill would place a proposed amendment to the Florida Constitution on the 2022 general election ballot. If passed by at least 60% of voters, this amendment would limit school board members to two 4-year terms.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

10th Amendment-Unconstitutional Federal Interference

HB 133 Prohibiting Cooperation with a United States Capitol Police Office. This bill would prevent state and local police agencies, or any other government agency from aiding or cooperating with U.S. Capitol Police. It further prohibits agencies from allowing U.S. Capitol Police to access state government databases.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Tax and Budget

HB 217 / SB 946 Film, Television, and Digital Media Project Rebate Program. This bill would create the Film, Television, and Digital Media Targeted Rebate Program and would offer film, TV, and digital media productions a rebate for the lesser of 20% or $2 million of production costs if they get pre-approved as a “certified project.” HB 217 is another attempt at a failed corporate welfare program by requiring certain benchmarks are met before tax rebates are awarded. The problem is this is still a form of corporate welfare, with the government picking winners and losers, in this case picking certain industries for favored treatment and taxpayer-funded handouts.

RLCFL OPPOSES

 

HB 489 / SB 434 Tourism. The Florida Tourism Industry Marketing Corporation, or VISIT FLORIDA as it is more commonly known, is currently set to sunset next year. These bills would extend that deadline more than eight years to October 1, 2028. Visit Florida is the state’s official tourism marketing organization, meaning taxpayer dollars are used to lure tourists to Florida. This spending of our money is based on the idea that if we do not do it, the tourist will not come to Florida. That is insane. Private enterprises like Disney World, other theme parks and resorts will spend their own money to bring tourists to Florida. While Visit Florida’s mission is to attract tourists to Florida, it has shown itself as a slush fund for campaign donors. Visit Florida hands out million-dollar contracts to hand-picked politically connected corporations.

RLCFL OPPOSES

 

HB 6093 / SB 1558 Tax on the Rental or Lease of Real Property. These bills repeal the sales tax on the commercial renting or leasing of real property.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Regulatory Reform

HB 5 / SB 146 Reducing Fetal and Infant Mortality. These bills ban most abortions after 15 weeks and do not include exceptions for rape and incest. It allows exceptions if an abortion is necessary to save the mother’s life or prevent serious injury or if a “fatal fetal abnormality” is detected.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 741 / SB 1024 Net Metering. These bills would change the existing net metering structure from one that promotes the development of renewable energy resources in this state to one that further enables government-granted monopoly power companies to charge higher prices and keep Floridians from having choices on how they power their homes and businesses. People and businesses across the state rely on net metering so they can take control of their own energy and choose how they power their lives.

RLCFL OPPOSES

 

HB 6029 Traffic Infraction Detectors. This bill repeals the use of red-light cameras in Florida.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Education

HB 7 / SB 148 Individual Freedom. These bills acknowledge the fundamental truth that all individuals are equal before the law and have inalienable rights. Accordingly, instruction and supporting materials in workplace training, K-12, and colleges must be consistent with the principles of individual freedom. These bills would ban the teaching of “Critical Race Theory”.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

SB 188 Civic Literacy Education. This bill is similar to the SB 146 Civics bill from last year that Governor DeSantis vetoed. Governor DeSantis was concerned that it would lead to “politicized action civics” that promotes protests instead of educating students on how government operates. Just like last year, this bill sets up a “Civic Engagement Citizen Scholar Program” at the “Center for Civic Engagement at the University of South Florida.” The bill also instructs the University of South Florida to contract with the YMCA’s “Youth in Government” program. In this case, everything depends on whether the University of South Florida and the YMCA’s Youth in Government program stay clear of politicized action civics. This bill could also be a loophole to teach Critical Race Theory (CRT), despite Governor DeSantis’s executive order to prohibit the teaching of CRT. The RLCFL would support a Civics bill but it must contain provisions that explicitly bar political protest and lobbying from state-sponsored civics programs.

RLCFL OPPOSES

 

HB 1467  K-12 Education. This bill would statutorily place term limits on School Board members to 2 4-year terms. This bill also requires school districts to list all library and instructional materials in use in an online inventory, with a multistep review process before adoption, including a mandatory public hearing.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 1557 / SB 1834 Parental Rights in Education. These bills reinforce the fundamental right of parents to make decisions regarding the upbringing and control of their children by prohibiting teachers from encouraging classroom discussions about sexual orientation or gender identity in primary grade levels or in a manner that is not age-appropriate or developmentally appropriate for students. These bills also allow parents to sue, seeking damages and reimbursement for attorney fees and court costs for violating this law.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Criminal Justice Reform

Florida is long overdue for comprehensive criminal justice reform that will reduce unnecessary incarceration and save taxpayer dollars, which will help balance the budget without raising taxes. Most importantly, these reforms can reduce recidivism and lead to lower crime rates. We support legislation that will allow citizens who have earned it a second chance at a free and productive life, instead of a life of government dependence and a waste of our tax dollars.    

 

HB 87 / SB 1118 Criminal History in Professional Licensing Applications. Florida law prohibits people with certain criminal offenses in their background from obtaining occupational licenses, and occupational licensing boards can broadly factor criminal backgrounds into licensing decisions through “good character” provisions. This creates an arbitrary barrier for returning citizens to gain access to dozens of occupations, increasing both financial insecurity and recidivism.

These bills shorten the period of time from five to two years for when past criminal convictions cannot be the sole ground to deny licenses for certain types of occupations and create a pipeline program that allows applicable licensing boards to approve the credits applicants received from the Department of Corrections’ educational programs to be counted towards licensing training requirements.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 171 / SB 504 Criminal Rehabilitation. These bills would allow prison inmates to reduce the length of their sentence through rehabilitation credits in addition to gain-time. “Gain-time” refers to the sentence reduction an inmate would receive off a sentence for good behavior, participation in beneficial programs, or another reason deemed acceptable by the Department of Correction.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 195 / SB 342 Juvenile Diversion Program Expunction. A second chance for minors to become productive citizens. SB 342/HB 195 would expand opportunities to expunge arrests from juvenile records to felony charges. Florida currently allows minors to expunge first-time misdemeanors if they complete a diversion program. These bills would expand juvenile expunction laws to include most felonies and other arrests beyond the first offense, except for violent felonies.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

HB 653 / SB 1200 Wrongful Convictions. These bills allow prosecutors, not just defense lawyers, to help vacate wrongful convictions should they find new evidence that proves someone’s innocence. Under these bills, a hearing would have to be set within 90 days of the prosecutor’s motion. If the defendant can’t afford a lawyer, one would have to be appointed.

In the case of “clear and convincing” evidence of innocence, the judge could vacate the verdict. If the judge decides not to reverse the conviction, the prosecutor could appeal. If the crime had a victim, that victim’s family would get a notice from the prosecuting attorney and would have the right to be at all hearings.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

Campaign Finance Reform

HB 1359  Campaign Finance. This bill includes a prohibition against fundraising during committee weeks. Currently, legislators cannot fundraise during the 60-day regular session, but the early committee weeks have been a frenzy of legislators fundraising while they are considering legislation. This bill will ensure that committee weeks serve their intended purpose rather than being overshadowed by a series of fundraisers that eclipse the legislative process. This bill would end “zombie” political committees that continue to exist even though the campaign has ended. Also, this bill raises the maximum contributions to legislative campaigns from $1,000 to $3,000.

RLCFL SUPPORTS

 

 

=================================================

The following firearm bills are filed by Democrats that violate our right to own and bear arms. Anti-gun rights bills filed by Democrats in the Florida legislature rarely are heard in any committee or brought to the floor of either chamber for a floor vote. We will track these bills and alert you if there is any movement on them. Historically bad gun bills have been filed by Republicans, for example, SB 7026 in 2018 and SB 7028 in 2019. 

 

HB 73 Use or Threatened Use of Force. This bill repeals the “stand your ground” law.

SB 204 Sale and Delivery of Firearms. This bill is known as “Universal Background Checks” would require private sales of firearms between citizens to transfer the weapon to a licensed dealer to run a background check before completing the transaction.

SB 210 Prohibited Recordkeeping Relating to Firearms or Firearm Owners. This bill would repeal Florida law that prohibits gun registrations.

SB 214/HB 199 Assault Weapons and Large-capacity Magazines. These bills prohibit the sale or transfer or possession of an assault weapon or a large-capacity magazine.

SB 220/HB 347 Sale, Transfer, or Storage of Firearms. These bills expand the scope of a state law regulating safe storage of guns, making it a violation to improperly secure a gun even if a minor does not get his or her hands on the weapon and requires gun owners to use a locked container or a trigger lock even when the gun owner is carrying or has the weapon nearby.

SB 334/HB 181 Sales of Ammunition. This bill requires background checks for the sale or transfer of ammunition.

SB 372/HB 83 Domestic Violence. These bills would mandate Law enforcement to confiscate guns upon arriving at the scene of a domestic violence complaint if a firearm is visible to a law enforcement officer or if permission is granted to search the home. This means an accused person could have to surrender their guns before a temporary order or a hearing. Domestic violence is a serious crime, but this is unnecessary and violates “Due Process.

SB 402/HB 19 Firearms. These bills would require the Department of Law enforcement to enter those who have had their firearm rights taken away through a court order in the Florida Crime Information Center database within 24 hours of receiving a court order.

SB 458 Secure Storage of Firearms. This bill mandates firearms storage requirements for licensed dealers, licensed manufacturers, and licensed importers. This bill authorizes agents or employees of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to perform inspections and provides penalties.

SB 496/HB 6049 Preemption of Firearms and Ammunition Regulation. This bill would allow municipalities to pass stricter gun regulations by undoing an existing state preemption law that bars local governments from passing any gun control measures stricter than state law.

 

#  #  #